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6 Brands and Designers to Look Out For Next Year

6 Brands and Designers to Look Out For Next Year

After a tumultuous 2022, fashion has found its rhythm again. London Fashion Week saw experimental designs such as Jack Irving’s inflatable wearable sculptures push boundaries while brands with meaningful ethos generated conversations and attracted celebrity endorsements.

Designer brands represent their customer’s lifestyle aspirations and lifestyle ideals. Their branding strategies communicate to their target demographic that it’s possible to be rich, stylish, and luxurious even on a limited budget.

Intellectual Athleticism

Intellectual athleticism encompasses three qualities that distinguish it from any other form of physical fitness: Strength, Fitness and Agility. Strength refers to genetic abilities which may act as powerful accelerators when combined with the appropriate subject matter; however, if untapped properly it could stall progress instead. 

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Fitness on the other hand refers to one’s capacity for sustained effort and maintaining mental wellness through visualization techniques – students become better prepared to adapt in real-life environments by practicing potential success or failure scenarios that help shape them through visualization exercises.

S. Drone Soccer and Robofest present an alternative view of STEM education, turning competition into a concrete way of nurturing future innovators. By merging physical fitness with intellectual pursuit, these events eschew conventional thought about creativity versus rigor in education.

No Sesso

No Sesso has long put community at the core of everything they do, making them one of the most inclusive labels on the runway. Their latest New York Fashion Week chapter, hosted in partnership with Levi’s and featuring dresses crafted from upcycled knitwear trimmed in crystal beading as well as short zip-front dresses that bridged office attire were proof enough.

Los Angeles-based brand, No Sex/No Gender’s name reflects this philosophy of its designers. Their collections challenge gender binary conventions while celebrating community. This season they sent musician Kelsey Lu down the runway in a show-stopping cropped orange coat!

Maisie Schloss

Maisie Schloss, a recent Parsons design graduate and former womenswear designer for Kanye West’s YEEZY brand, is now fully immersing her vision through the launch of her namesake label. 

As one of Chicago’s foremost Gen Z fashion prodigies (her last name combines both her first and mother’s maiden names), Maisie caught Kanye’s eye; thus becoming eligible to receive the inaugural YEEZY designer incubator grant that provided financial backing and mentorship support as she pursued her own brand of artful yet wearable clothing designs.

Schloss’s form-fitting silhouettes channel both rhythmic gymnastics and the ’90s club scene, mixing saccharine romance with something sinister. Lace tube tops, body-hugging perforated knit halter dresses and lavender pantsuits come paired with kraft paper tie dresses printed with alien 3D faces and recontextualized organic textures for an eclectic yet pleasing ensemble.

No doubt about it: Jorja Smith and Kylie Jenner have taken notice of Schloss’s designs, lauding her flash-lit low-fi images featuring dancers piled atop each other with syrupy colors and complex patterns in an array of flash lighting ad campaigns highlighting her pieces. Her debut ad campaign featuring flashes of flash light imagery showing dancers dancing is clear evidence that Schloss is onto something.

Kenneth Ize

Kenneth Ize of Nigeria burst onto the fashion radar as a 2019 LVMH Prize finalist thanks to his colorful optimistic designs and captivating Paris runway shows–featuring Naomi Campbell and Imaan Hammam models as models–that placed an emphasis on craftsmanship, showing how indigenous motifs and fabrics can be given modern interpretations.

Ize is best known for launching his namesake label in 2013 (and relaunching it last year), as well as designing his capsule collection for Karl Lagerfeld, both celebrating African culture while rejecting any stigmatized taglines attached to “Made in…” Taglines. Based in Lagos, Nigeria he works closely with weavers, artisans and design groups from his home nation in order to reinterpret traditional West African fabrics and Nigerian craft while working closely with weavers, artisans and design groups within Nigeria itself.

Ize’s collections offer everything from skirts adorned with ouroboros–a ancient symbol depicting serpents devouring their own tails–to cocoon-like robes covered with geometric aso oke prints. He proudly wears his heritage on his sleeves and this emotional authenticity comes through in each garment’s timeless appeal, reflecting universal human experiences.

Marie Adam-Leenaerdt

Brussels-based 27-year-old designer Vanessa Arlt combines process-oriented design with her passionate love of patterns to craft clothing with timeless appeal that defies trends. Her brand, Vanessa Arlt Design, stands the test of time.

Skirts are at the core of her collection and she ingeniously reinvents them into trapeze dresses, collar-waistband hybrids and convertible bags with horizontal zippers that expand its silhouette. By providing multiple options that expand its functionality she challenges conventional perceptions of fashion items as single-purpose garments and sparks reevaluation of wardrobe essentials.

Marie Adam-Leenaert’s designs may be playful, but her cuts are store-ready. She presented her SS24 collection at an empty Kookai store in Paris’ 6th arrondissement and secured new accounts with Bergdorf Goodman and Dover Street Market last season. Her padded down coats with built-in scarves and smart-looking straight-leg trousers have commercial potential while matching tailored jackets featuring unusual button plackets have even greater store presence.

Roisin Pierce

Dublin-based designer Roisin Pierce celebrates crochet lace as an expressive form in her frothy all-white collections, celebrating both its femininity and paradoxes arising from its use–“blurred lines as to whether this craft is oppressive, liberating or simply expression.”

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Since launching her eponymous brand in 2019, Pierce’s work has been showcased across various global media, such as Vogue Paris, i-D and AnOther. Recently she collaborated with LVMH on creating a capsule collection and this week was proudly announced by Dover Street Market Brand Incubator Paris that her label would receive production support as part of Dover Street Market Brand Incubator Paris program.

Pierce has previously relied solely on self-funding for her operations; now, this new arrangement may help expand beyond her modest operations where each garment takes 10 days to produce and may allow her to explore different surface textural experiments to expand into new categories like accessories.

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